The Man Who Loved Libraries

The Man Who Loved Libraries: The Story of Andrew Carnegie
  • Author: Andrew Larsen
  • Illustrator: Katty Maurey
  • Publisher: Owlkids
  • Print Length: 32 pages
  • Release Date: August 15, 2017
  • I Rate it:    
  • GenrePotpourri
  • Purchase on Amazon

Book Summary

When he was a child in the 1840s, Andrew Carnegie and his family immigrated to America in search of a new beginning. His working-class Scottish family arrived at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Carnegie worked hard, in factories and telegraphy. He invested in railroads, eventually becoming the richest man in the world during his time.

Carnegie believed strongly in sharing his wealth, and one of the ways he did this was by funding the construction of over 2,500 public libraries around the world. His philanthropy completely revolutionized public libraries, which weren’t widespread at the time.

Told in simple, lyrical text, the story unfolds against striking, stylized illustrations that transport readers to the bustle and boom of the Industrial Revolution. An informational spread explains more about Carnegie’s life and work.When he was a child in the 1840s, Andrew Carnegie and his family immigrated to America in search of a new beginning. His working-class Scottish family arrived at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Carnegie worked hard, in factories and telegraphy. He invested in railroads, eventually becoming the richest man in the world during his time.

The Man Who Loved Libraries: The Story of Andrew Carnegie - banner

About The Author

ANDREW LARSEN'S picture book, The Imaginary Garden (Kids Can Press), was nominated for a Governor General's Award in 2009. Andrew lives in Toronto, where he is a writer and a stay-at-home dad.

You can find Andrew on:

Andrew Larsen

Book Review by Bree Herron

Want a book that is not only visually pleasing to all readers but will get children excited about libraries? This book did the trick in my household. Andrew Carnegie’s story was will written and beautifully illustrated.

Reading a children’s book always makes me feel calm and relaxed. It must be the illustrations or maybe it is the use of language that all can understand. With this book there was the beauty of life, and struggle within the history by this pillar of a man. I was eager to share this story with my daughter, and we read it three times in a row. We talked about the pictures, and the people.

One aspect of the illustrations was the ability to create a dialogue about the pictures. We read the words then made up our own stories. Though my daughter is three she had a great time talking about what books Andrew was reading!

I Rate it

Do you enjoy non-fiction picture books?

**DISCLAIMER: I was provided an opportunity to read this book as an Advanced Reader Copy in return for a fair and honest review.

Professional Reader Affiliates

NetGalley Professional Reader 50 Book Reviews 2016 NetGalley Challenge Reviews Published Great Escape Tour Host BethanyHouse Blogger Reviewer

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